Today in Middle Eastern history: the Eisenhower Doctrine, or: They All Lived Happily Ever After (1957)

The United States enjoys two things more than just about anything else: doing war and making up doctrines about doing war. If you include “domestic” conflicts like the genocide of Native Americans, the United States has been at war for almost its entire existence, and of its 44 presidents, at least a quarter of them have issued some kind of directive regarded as a “doctrine” today. That’s including the Roosevelt Corollary, which technically was Teddy Roosevelt’s revision of the Monroe Doctrine, but it was a pretty significant revision (from defending the Americas from European intervention to announcing US intervention in the rest of the Americas), so I think it warrants inclusion. On the other hand I’m not including the Polk Doctrine, which was just a restatement of the Monroe Doctrine, and anyway we’re getting into the weeds a bit, aren’t we?

This is just a placeholder. If you’d like to read the rest please check out my new home, Foreign Exchanges!

One thought on “Today in Middle Eastern history: the Eisenhower Doctrine, or: They All Lived Happily Ever After (1957)

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.